Goodbye Christopher Robin

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“But it isn’t easy, said Pooh. Because poetry and hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is to go where they can find you.”

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I recently watched the film Goodbye Christopher Robin. I’m a sucker for movies that are based on a true story and given my love for Winnie the Pooh, the film was instantly added to my must-watch list.

I grew up watching the show Welcome to Pooh Corner, as well as the animated Winnie the Pooh episodes. Needless to say, I was already familiar with the iconic characters. What I wasn’t familiar with, however, was the backstory of A.A. Milne, the author of Winne the Pooh, as well as several other children’s books.

Before I started watching Goodbye Christopher Robin, I was under the assumption that the movie would go into detail regarding the origins of the beloved characters that we’ve all grown to love such as Pooh, Eeyore, Rabbit, and others. Although this is the case, I was not prepared for what I was about to see.

Goodbye Christopher Robin not only sheds light on A.A. Milne’s life, it dives deep into his relationship with his son (hence, the title). Viewers are quickly introduced to flashbacks of Milne’s time during WWI. These flashbacks are spread throughout the rest of the film, mirroring events that occur in the present day. This is when the film began to touch me to my core.

I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a movie portray Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in such an accurate way. From loud noises to flashbacks, viewers spend quite a bit of time watching Milne struggle to go back to “normal” life after coming home from the war. What started as an interesting film in my must-watch list, ended up being a movie that shed light on mental illness, featuring an accurate portrayal of a person struggling with the effects of PTSD.

I don’t want to spoil the movie for you, especially if you’re not familiar with the backstory of author A.A. Milne’s life. However, I think it’s important to note that this movie is so much more than it seems. It touched my life and spoke to me, which is what art is supposed to do.

If you’re interested in learning the origins of Winnie the Pooh and watching a story unfold onscreen that is based on a true account of someone’s life, then you will absolutely enjoy this film. It is sure to stick with you for an incredibly long time.

Hope

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Courage.

Heart.

Empathy.

In the past year, have you determined where you stand? Have you opened your eyes to the sexism swirling around every aspect of our country? Have you noticed the discrimination against LGBT people wrapped in the disguise of “religious freedom?” Have you finally seen how racism has shaped our country and continues to shape it? Have you vowed to take a firm stance against sexism, racism, ant-gay prejudice, and xenophobia? Now is the time. If you pledge allegiance to the flag, don’t just pledge to the white stars. You pledge to make this country a place of love, not hate. You pledge to make this country a place where hateful ideals end. You pledge to take a stand for equality and against discrimination of any kind. America can be great – with hope and love. Take a stand today. Bring love now. Bring hope for future generations. 

 

A Jedi. A Mockingjay. A Wizard. A superhero. Who are you?

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Star Wars. Star Trek. The Hunger Games. The Lord of the Rings. Harry Potter. Superheroes. Why is it that we’re attracted to such epic stories? Why do we rewatch and reread our favorite tales? Surely any Star Wars fan realizes that the Empire created a galaxy that was unfairly ruled. Surely fans of The Hunger Games recognize that President Snow is a dictator and the districts are treated unfairly. Surely Sauron and Voldemort are seen as villains, right? Why do we read these books and watch these films over and over? What’s the point of having knowledge of these stories if we don’t take what we’ve learned and apply it to our lives? We can reread and rewatch all we want, but who is that helping? Are we simply using our favorite tales as an escape?

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On some deeper level, we’ve connected to these stories. We’ve rooted for the underdog, for those facing adversity. We’ve immersed ourselves into these worlds, but it’s time to acknowledge the world we currently live in. Isn’t it time to apply what we’ve learned to the world around us? If we want to prevent all the horrors rebels fought against (poverty, inequality, prejudices, and so forth), why aren’t we using what we’ve learned from these stories? Why can’t we make the world a better place now? The thought of wielding a wand, bow, phaser, or lightsaber is exciting, but we already have weapons we can use. Our voices. Our votes. In order to prevent Emperor Palaptine or President Snow from leading our country and the world into total chaos, shouldn’t we be applying the knowledge we’ve learned to prevent things like this from happening?

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If we want a progressive, Star Trek future, its time to work toward it. While we sit and dream about better futures, the world keeps spinning and we miss our chance. If we want to change the world, now is the time to understand the morals and meanings of our favorite films and books. What are these stories trying to tell us? Don’t be a villain. Don’t give in to greed and hatred. Stand up for acceptance and love. Stand against prejudice and hate. Sacrifice yourself, money, and time for a greater cause. We write our own stories each day. Will you be rooted for or rooted against? We’re all flawed, but we can still be heroes. Make sure your story is worth reading.

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